Blepharitis

Blepharitis London
Blepharitis is the chronic inflammation, or infection, of the eyelids and the eyelash follicles along the edge of the eyelid. Blepharitis, which is not contagious, affects patients of all ages.


Causes of Blepharitis

There are several reasons for the occurrence of blepharitis, some of them are:

  • Seborrheic dermatitis
  • Acne
  • Bacterial infection
  • Allergic reaction
  • Poor eyelid hygiene
  • Rosacea

Symptoms of Blepharitis

Symptoms of blepharitis include:

  • Red or swollen eyes
  • Red or swollen eyelids
  • Blurry vision
  • Frequent tearing of the eyes
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Burning sensation in the eyes
  • Eyelids that are crusty, flaky or scaly

In more serious cases, sores can form when the crusting skin is removed, the eyelashes may fall out, the eyelids can become deformed, the infection can spread to the cornea, and patients often experience excessive tearing. Blepharitis can also cause styes, chalazion, and problems with the tear film.


Diagnosis of Blepharitis

The doctor will be able to diagnose blepharitis after a thorough examination of your eyes. Some of the items examined include:

  • Examining the eye
  • Evaluating the margins of the eye, the eyelashes and the oil glands
  • Reviewing the medical history of the patient
  • Testing eye pressure

Treatment of Blepharitis

There is no cure for blepharitis. There is a tendency for the condition to recur making it difficult to treat. It can be controlled with proper hygiene of the eyelids. Treatment and preventative care for blepharitis involves a thorough but gentle cleaning of the eyelids, face, and scalp. Warm compresses can be applied to loosen crust and a gentle baby shampoo can help keep the eyelids clean. This treatment may be combined with antibiotics if a bacterial infection is determined to be the cause of the condition.



Contact us to learn more about Blepharitis

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Locations in London

My NHS practice is based at the world-renowned Moorfields Eye Hospital in London. I consult private patients at Moorfields Private Eye Hospital, Optegra London Eye Hospital and The Harley Street Clinic.